Mesopic vision
and road lighting

Attend the upcoming webinar

The real story of how rods and cones affect your peripheral vision

 

Join this webinar hosted by Wout van Bommel, and learn how the inner workings of the human eye affect road lighting for peripheral vision at different lighting levels and colors.

 

Live on January 28, 4 pm CET (10 am EST)

 

Register now

 

Driving at night can be challenging. Streetlights come in different colors and light intensities, and oncoming traffic scatters bright light straight into your field of vision, making it harder to gauge distance. At the same time, you have to stay alert and keep a good overview of what is going on around you – in all directions.

 

Road lighting is an essential ingredient for safe driving at night. It should enable to see whether or not the path ahead is free of obstacles. To get a clear view of the surrounding traffic, you also need to rely on your peripheral vision. Recent scientific insights have led to new perspectives on the role played by different light wavelengths in road lighting applications.

 

In Mesopic vision - The real story, you will discover how the light-sensitive cells in our eyes – the rods and cones – are activated in different ways by different lighting levels and colors. As the eyes’ adaptation levels rise from scotopic to mesopic to photopic, our vision changes. Getting the light right can help us keep drivers safe on the way to their destination.

 

Interested, but not able to join us live? Register anyways to receive the recording.

 

Register now

Presented by:

 

Wout van Bommel is an independent lighting consultant with 35 years’ experience at Philips Lighting.

His focus is on the many ways that lighting can affect and improve people’s health and well-being. His new book “Road Lighting, fundamentals, technology and application”, will be published in January, 2015.

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